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The VIPER Garage  |  Viper Racing Discussions  |  Viper Road Racing Discussions  |  "Going Faster"
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Author Topic: "Going Faster"  (Read 1496 times)
Leslie
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« on: October 28, 2010, 05:26:47 PM »

Going Faster by Carl Lopez, The Skip Barber Racing school

A good friend, mentor and long-time instructor of mine asked me, "How do you keep busy during the winter months?".  Of course I said I watch track videos and dream of spring.  He suggested the book 'Going Faster' as a good way to fill my off track time.  I couldn't put it down, I loved all the quotes and found myself many times thinking, wow, I never thought of driving being so..thought out! haha.

I have found it to be one of the most valuable books I have ever read, and consider it my ‘bible’ of how to handle my Viper, whether it’s on a road course or the street.

Understanding how and why your Viper responds to throttle and brake input is half the battle of being able to drive your Viper instead of IT driving YOU.  

Below are a few of my favorite quotes from the book, along with my personal experiences on a road course as a HPDE driver/instructor.  

********************************************************************************

Quote:
"Most amateur drivers go too fast in slow corners and too slow in fast corners." Emerson Fittipaldi
Mark Donohue & Skip Barber have said. “You should always be unwinding the steering wheel on the way out of the corner, if not turn in was too early.”  Going Faster Page 39-40

Thoughts:
The safe way on a road course is the fast way, meaning…slow in/fast out carries much more speed through the turns and sets you up for the straights.
Turning in LATE into an apex results in... a later apex.  (Putnam Park road course is a perfect example of what I call a ‘late apex’ course).  “Unwinding the wheel” is smoooothly straightening out the wheel.  Typically higher hp cars turn in later in order to open up the wheel and get on the throttle faster.  I have found this to be true of my GTS.   I also try to find as many straight lines as possible on a road course to take advantage of all the hp.  The straighter my wheel is, the faster I can go.  There should be a direct correlation between your wheel and your right foot!

Quote:
Faster drivers typically “start throttle application later but get to full throttle sooner.” Pg 134
“The good driver is already looking at the apex when the steering wheel is turned.”  
To go the fastest you must hit the apex perfect.  “12 inches off the apex losses 7/10 miles an hour.” Pg 22
To hit the apex perfect you must slow down, either by turn in or from turn in to apex.
 Accelerating too hard or too soon, snaps the back end out scrubbing off 1.5-2mph speed. Pg 137`

Thoughts:
How many times have we all at one point or another taken a turn to ‘hot’ (fast) and been on the gas toooo soon and what happens?  Yeh, the ‘Venom bite’ ….backend comes out on you..it’s fun, sure, I do it…BUT…on a road course, that’s a perfect example of getting on the throttle too soon out of the apex, therefore ‘scrubbing speed’.  You are going too fast whenever you find the Viper won’t turn on an arc that will get you to your apex. (road course application here)….Make sense?
The perfect apex exit is to carefully apply the throttle through the turn, finding that exact spot where you can be ready for FULL throttle.   When you have mastered this, you will never have to lift in order to find your maximum speed.


Quote:
 “I believe that you should only get on the gas when you’re ready to commit achieving full throttle and aren’t ready to give any back.”  Patrick Long




Thoughts:
Wow is THIS ever true!  I have a theory of my own that I have found with the Viper is key…you are either on the throttle or on the brake….nowhere else.  (i.e., no ‘coasting').  What are you telling your Viper to do?  It needs to know, one or the other.

 


« Last Edit: February 19, 2011, 03:52:09 PM by Leslie » Logged
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Viper Nation - ezine
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2010, 11:11:03 PM »

Me too.  I love reading a book when relaxing.
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1999 1200rwhp TT GTS - ART, 2001 Roe sc GTS- (4 sale), 440 Duster restomod (sold), 3x Stealth TTs, 92 Daytona IROC with T3, 580whp/1080wtq Cummins pickup.
Steve 00RT/10
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2010, 05:35:26 AM »

These are all good thoughts and advice

Here's a couple more from my limited experience.

Assuming you have turned in and apexed correctly, I like to think of "The Unwind" as the mating of the right foot with steering wheel turn out.  In other words, the further you unwind the wheel, the more throttle you can apply until you can mash it.  I don't think of this as two separate things.  They are symbiotically joined.  One is a function of the other.

Corner exit speed is a critical part of good lap times

Always set the front end down before applying big brakes.  Braking should be done before turn in...especially non-ABS cars (me)

Steve
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2010, 09:10:43 AM »

Sounds like  a cool book.  I'll have to look for it.

I'm not sure I'll ever use my Viper as a track car, but with MillerMP close, I'd love to get more road course experience.
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Viper Nation - ezine
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2010, 10:38:27 AM »

So one good ride around the track in the Nurburgring ACR and you're converted now?  That was a ride wasn't it?

Question Tim, You have the Venom spoiler at back - did you add the Roe racing front fascia scoop to the front?



It adds to the cooling capacity of the car as well as increasing the downforce of the front.

Ted
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1999 1200rwhp TT GTS - ART, 2001 Roe sc GTS- (4 sale), 440 Duster restomod (sold), 3x Stealth TTs, 92 Daytona IROC with T3, 580whp/1080wtq Cummins pickup.
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